To thee, O God, I will sing a new canticle: on the banjo and an instrument of five strings I will sing praises to thee.

To thee, O God, I will sing a new canticle: on the banjo and an instrument of five strings I will sing praises to thee.

signorcasaubon:

Raymond Diocres was a learned Doctor in Paris, and friend and mentor of the founder of the Carthusian Order, St. Bruno. He was said to have led as close to a sinless life as possible. Three days after his death, as Mass was celebrated for the repose of his soul, and when the Office for the Dead had reached the passage that asked: “What are my faults and sins? Make known to me my misdeeds” the whole assemblage was astonished— and frightened beyond belief— when the dead body of Diocres rose from the catalfaque, and exclaimed aloud: “Justi Dei condemnatus sum”— By the judgment of God, I am damned! The hidden sins of Diocres, which he hid underneath the veil of outward sanctity, condemned him to Hell for all eternity.This experience was said to have mortified St. Bruno significantly, so much so that the Carthusians, even after the centuries, are still known for their exceptional rigor, and as the most ascetic of all the cloistered orders of the Church.
Compare with Eustache Le Seuer’s version of the event, here.

yikes…

signorcasaubon:

Raymond Diocres was a learned Doctor in Paris, and friend and mentor of the founder of the Carthusian Order, St. Bruno. He was said to have led as close to a sinless life as possible. Three days after his death, as Mass was celebrated for the repose of his soul, and when the Office for the Dead had reached the passage that asked: “What are my faults and sins? Make known to me my misdeeds” the whole assemblage was astonished— and frightened beyond belief— when the dead body of Diocres rose from the catalfaque, and exclaimed aloud: “Justi Dei condemnatus sum”— By the judgment of God, I am damned! The hidden sins of Diocres, which he hid underneath the veil of outward sanctity, condemned him to Hell for all eternity.

This experience was said to have mortified St. Bruno significantly, so much so that the Carthusians, even after the centuries, are still known for their exceptional rigor, and as the most ascetic of all the cloistered orders of the Church.

Compare with Eustache Le Seuer’s version of the event, here.

yikes…

(via purgatorialsociety)

Finally…

Finally…

The Wood homestead is waking up to spring. Chickies are growing, heirloom seeds are sprouting, the sourdough starter is revived and bubbling, and Ziggy the guard pooch’s ankle is back to nearly 100%

Found this gem in hiding in one of my liturgical books: the Sacred Congregation if Rites’ declaration regarding the restored order of Holy Week. Might make good tinder for the holy fire next week…

Found this gem in hiding in one of my liturgical books: the Sacred Congregation if Rites’ declaration regarding the restored order of Holy Week. Might make good tinder for the holy fire next week…

My wife is not a mixologist; invents the whiskey sweet

  • Wife: (from the kitchen) How do you make a whiskey sour?
  • Me: (silence...)
  • Wife: (returning to living room minutes later with a drink)
  • Me: You figured it out? What did you do?
  • Wife: I mixed equal parts.
  • Me: ...of all three ingredients?
  • Wife: ...<i>three</i> ingredients?

Tags: whiskey wives

Hello Matthieu! This is an entirely different subject, but one worth discussing (perhaps in person). There are a lot of difficulties that arise in Moral Theology in the situation of an intersexed person, and unfortunately the Church has not yet had much to say on a relatively important topic. As far as ministry goes, we are all called to the apostolate, regardless of sex/gender. But when it comes to Holy Orders, a person must be biologically male. Period. I understand that this leads to difficulties in defining the gender (as a biological, rather than sociological construct) of intersexed people, especially if they have undergone selective surgery. Only about 10% of intersexed people claim not to identify with a gender. But this is not the territory for mere armchair theologians, which I am, but your are not, Rev Case :) But let&#8217;s chat in person next time you come north.

Hello Matthieu! This is an entirely different subject, but one worth discussing (perhaps in person). There are a lot of difficulties that arise in Moral Theology in the situation of an intersexed person, and unfortunately the Church has not yet had much to say on a relatively important topic. As far as ministry goes, we are all called to the apostolate, regardless of sex/gender. But when it comes to Holy Orders, a person must be biologically male. Period. I understand that this leads to difficulties in defining the gender (as a biological, rather than sociological construct) of intersexed people, especially if they have undergone selective surgery. Only about 10% of intersexed people claim not to identify with a gender. But this is not the territory for mere armchair theologians, which I am, but your are not, Rev Case :) But let’s chat in person next time you come north.

I’ve noticed a lot of high church Lutherans, Episcopalians, and Anglicans on Tumblr who are interested in ecclesiastical finery and beautiful liturgy, and also post an alarming amount of homoerotic—and often downright pornographic—content. This says two things, one about those sects, and one about homosexuality.

About those sects, it is a continued testament to the license that they give themselves, first to interpret the Holy Scriptures in a way that condones their lifestyles rather in a manner that calls them to conform their lives to a new standard, and secondly to ignore the testimony of the Church Fathers on the subject of sexual ethics and morality. You can only create so many novelties about the word arsenokoites. They have conformed themselves to the image of the world, rather than to that of God.

Regarding homosexuality, it is a clear sign that sensuality and lust play a primary—and therefore perverted—role for those who are involved in it. Were it a normal, healthy manifestation of sexuality intended by God, it would still demand chastity, purity, and a quieting of concupiscence and lust. Yet we see the opposite. Sensual and suggestive (and often pornographic) images are posted alongside photos of Solemn Masses and paintings of Our Lady. There is no attempt to foster the virtue of chastity, but rather it is mocked.

Increasingly, I’m seeing Catholics falling into this group as well, some even claiming to discern a priestly vocation. This is disturbing regardless of whether they are sharing their sexual proclivity actively on Tumblr. It is enough that they do not eschew acting upon their inclinations.

We need to conform our lives to the Gospel, not the Gospel to our lives.

Jesus, lover of chastity, make us clean of heart!

Blessed are they who hear the word of God and keep it

Today’s Gospel is too often used as an opportunity to downplay or even refute the high estate of the Blessed Virgin, as is the weekday Gospel from last week wherein our Lord asks, “Who is my mother?” In today’s Gospel a woman praises the Mother of our Savior, exclaiming, “Blessed is the womb that bore Thee, and the breasts that nourished Thee!” Here our Lord rebuked her, saying, “Yea rather, Blessed are they who hear the word of God and keep it.”

But this is no refutation of the great dignity of the Mother of God, rather, it is an indication that this dignity is for reasons far beyond the role she played in salvation history as Mother. Father Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalene explains:

"Of course, the Virgin Mary is blessed because she gave birth to the Redeemer, but she is still more blessed through her perfect union with Him in the observance of His word. This blessedness is not reserved for Mary alone; it is offered to every soul of good will and constitutes the greatest guarantee of victory over evil, for one united to God become strong with his strength."

echiromani:

The station church for the Friday of the Second Week of Lent is S. Vitale in Fovea (400). The oldest extant portion of the church is the 5th century portico, with significant rebuilding in 1475. The church is now located several feet under the street level of the Via Nazionale. It is dedicated to Saints Vitalis, Valeria, Gervase, and Protase, ancient martyrs of Milan.

If you’re not following this tumblr, just… shame on you.